Browsed by
Tag: temple

The Temple of Karnak and Luxor: Where Time Stands Still

The Temple of Karnak and Luxor: Where Time Stands Still

January 8. 4 pm. Luxor.

I’m sitting on the deck of an old-fashioned felucca, the same sailing boats Egyptians have used for thousands of years. Our captain, Saleh, works with his first mate to unfurl the sails and push the tiny boat into the Nile’s mighty current.

luxor

luxor

luxor

There’s no motor on this boat, which means it’ll be slow going today. But that’s okay. There’s nothing we want to do for the next hour except lay back, drink some karkade (hibiscus tea), and reminisce about the two incredible days we’ve spent in Luxor.

luxor

Our horse ride yesterday morning was spectacular – a perfect introduction to the region’s impressive history. In the afternoon we met our guide for the next two days, Rumany, a big jolly man somewhat reminisce of an Egyptian Santa Claus. Rumany had a habit of cracking himself up with his own jokes, which made our tours that much more entertaining.

luxor

We began on the East Bank with what would be both my and Jeremy’s favorite temple in Egypt – Karnak.

It’s a city of temples constructed over a period of 2,000 years (2055BC-100AD), back when the surrounding city was known as Thebes. The temple is dedicated to the worship of the Theban trinity of Amun, Mut, and Khonsu. It’s considered the single largest religious structure ever made, covering a total area of 200 square acres.

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

To put it into perspective, the inner Great Temple area alone is large enough to hold St. Peter’s Basilica, Milan Cathedral, and Notre Dame Cathedral side-by-side inside it.

Okay, so it’s big. But how does it look?

In a word: Awe-inspiring.

luxor

The most impressive feature is the Hypostyle Hall, consisting of 134 towering columns spanning an area of 54,000 square feet (16,500m). 4,000-year-old paint still clings to some of the hieroglyphics. Only 20% of the original temple remains, but it’s a darn impressive 20%.

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

With the sun sinking lower, we made the short drive back into the heart of Luxor. Next stop: the appropriately named Luxor Temple. It spans over 1,000 years of history, from its original construction in 1390BC to the granite shrine dedicated to Alexander the Great in 332BC. It also houses a Coptic church and a mosque.

luxor

luxor

Though not as large as its cousin Karnak, it’s still a beautiful and impressive sight. We wandered its ancient columns, pillars, and obelisks as dusk faded and the temple lit up.

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

This blog wouldn’t be complete without a shout-out to Sofra, a traditional Egyptian house converted into an elegant, affordable, and delicious restaurant. The food was so great we dined there three nights in a row! Among their specialties we tried were stuffed pigeon, stewed rabbit, roasted lamb shank, and a dizzying variety of hot and cold mezes (appetizers).

luxor

luxor

luxor

Breakfast at our hotel was not overrated either. Ful, an omelet station, fresh bread, veggies, and four types of cheese. I see nothing wrong with this picture!

luxor

We needed the fuel for another long day of touring. Rumany picked us up again (all smiles and laughter) and we crossed the bridge to Luxor’s West Bank to begin our day.

Once the ancient Egyptian capital shifted from Memphis in the north (near Cairo) to Thebes (now Luxor), the kings decided to hide their burial chambers in the mountains rather than build huge pyramids. Thus, the Valley of the Kings (and the Queens) began.

To date, 64 tombs have been discovered in the Valley of the Kings, including the still-intact tomb of Tutankhamun. This was noteworthy because the other tombs had long ago been pillaged and robbed of their treasures.

luxor

King Tut’s tomb was believed to be “cursed” because Howard Carter and the men who discovered it all died within two years. In reality, though, scientists suspect something used to preserve the mummy slowly “poisoned” the air over thousands of years.

Whichever theory you subscribe to, it’s an incredible sight to behold. We toured three of the 64 tombs, all of which are empty now except for giant sarcophagi (yes, that’s a word) and floor-to-ceiling hieroglyphics. Sorry I don’t have photos for you, but cameras aren’t allowed inside the tombs!

luxor

luxor

luxor

Next stop: the Temple of Queen Hatshepsut. The only female Pharaoh in Egyptian history, theories abound about this powerful woman. She’s often portrayed as a man and supposedly claimed to be a demi-god. Could she have been the woman who found and raised baby Moses?

No one can say for certain, but her tomb carved into the mountain speaks of Egypt’s once-mighty status. Interestingly, despite her impressive mortuarium, her remains have never been found.

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

Speaking of queens, the last stop on our West Bank tour was the Valley of the Queens. 80 tombs have been discovered here, although nowhere near as large or ornate as the Valley of the Kings.

We were literally the only ones there!

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

After a quick stop at the Colossi of Memnon and a farewell to Rumany, we took the ferry across the Nile and enjoyed a leisurely lunch on the riverbank. When we were offered a private felucca sail for 100 pounds (about $5), we couldn’t resist.

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

So here we are, drifting lazily down the Nile in our very own felucca. Saleh even let us pilot his boat for part of the journey!

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

luxor

Luxor has been beyond amazing – sights, people, horses, food. I can’t wait to see what Dahab and the Red Sea have in store for us!

luxor

Aswan & Abu Simbel: Jewels of Upper Egypt

Aswan & Abu Simbel: Jewels of Upper Egypt

January 6. 3 pm. Aswan.

I’m sitting on the east bank of the river Nile, enjoying the warmth of the afternoon sun. In a few moments we’ll be heading to the train station and onward to Luxor, but for now I’m reflecting on two days spent in Upper Egypt (which is actually the southernmost part, because the Nile flows from south to north).

aswan

aswan

Anyway. After a surprisingly pleasant 14-hour overnight train ride from Cairo, we arrived in Aswan yesterday at 10 am. Instantly it had a different “feel” than Cairo did. Cairo, for the most part, felt like a crowded and more hectic version of a large European city.

When we got off the train in Aswan, on the other hand, we were definitely in Africa. The streets were filled with horse-drawn carriages and donkey-drawn carts. Although temperatures were warmer, the locals were more conservatively dressed, especially the women. Most people had much darker skin, too, evidence of their ancient Nubian background (which they are indeed very proud of).

We meet our driver and head to our hotel, situated a few miles out of downtown on a hilltop overlooking the Nile. For the moment, we appear to be the hotel’s only guests. Since our tour doesn’t start until later in the afternoon, we enjoy a leisurely lunch on the empty but beautiful pool deck.

aswan

aswan

There’s no menu, but the cook, Gaman, proudly assures us he can cook any Nubian dish we like. Since we know nothing about Nubian food, we ask him to surprise us. He soon returns – wearing a jacket and tie this time – with enough food to feed the Egyptian army.

No, really.

aswan

aswan

Gaman presents us with bread, rice, salad, carrot-lentil soup, a whole grilled chicken, pickled vegetables, and our first taste of molokhyna, a local green sauce made from spinach, okra, and mild spices. The food was delicious, his service exceptional, and the whole thing was a little surreal, considering there was not another soul in sight.

With overstuffed bellies (we barely made a dent in all the food he provided – I do hope the staff finished it!), we headed outside to meet our guide and another young couple from Brazil. We transfer to a minivan and are joined by a couple from Philadelphia (the first Americans we’ve met on the trip) and the six of us set off for the famed Temple of Philae.

aswan

This temple is noteworthy for a few reasons.

First, it was built around 280BC by Ptolemy II, son of Ptolemy I (one of Alexander the Great’s Generals who ruled the divided Greek empire after his death). It was built on an island using features of Roman, Greek, and Egyptian architecture. And for hundreds of years after Christianity spread through Egypt, it was used as a Coptic church.

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

But what really makes this temple interesting? The entire thing was deconstructed, moved, and rebuilt on a different island during the 1960s.

Why? Because of the construction of the Aswan High Dam during that decade. The dam resulted in the creation of Lake Nasser, one of the largest manmade lakes in the world. This enormous reservoir required many things to be relocated, including hundreds of Nubian villages, the temples at Abu Simbel (more on those later) and also the beautiful Philae Temple.

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

You’d never know it wasn’t in its original location, because it was perfectly reconstructed. It’s a unique blend of architectural styles, Egyptian hieroglyphics, Coptic crosses, Greek and Coptic writing, and a spectacular setting.

To reach it, you pass through a small Nubian market and board a local ferry boat. The boat ride alone is a treat; the temple itself is the icing on the cake!

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswan

aswanaswan

aswan

aswan

After returning to the mainland, we made a quick stop at the top of Aswan High Dam, where we learned more about its construction and impressive size. The dam is over half a mile wide at its base and has a volume greater than SEVENTEEN Great Pyramids of Giza!

aswan

aswan

Interestingly, the dam also created a protected habitat for Nile crocodiles in the reservoir behind it. There are no wild crocs anywhere in Egypt beyond the dam, from Aswan all the way to Cairo and the Mediterranean.

aswan

Thanks to lingering jetlag and our very early start the next day, we crashed around 7 pm. Received a wake-up call bright and early (dark and early, actually) at 3:30 the next morning so we could prepare for our tour of Abu Simbel.

For this tour, we joined about 20 other travelers on a full-sized bus. Thank goodness, because the journey south to Abu Simbel (near the border of Sudan) takes over three hours each way. We snagged a few more hours of sleep before the bus rattled to a stop on the side of the highway so we could enjoy the sunrise over the Sahara.

aswan

aswan

aswan

After driving past sand, sand, and more sand, we arrived at the waterfront temples of Abu Simbel. These majestic structures sit on the shores of Lake Nasser, the same artificial lake created by the Aswan High Dam. We were over a hundred and fifty miles south of Aswan at this point, but we’d barely covered a fraction of the lake’s shoreline!

aswan

aswan

aswan

Like Philae, these iconic temples were also relocated from the original place. Otherwise, our guide explained, they’d be located about 200 feet underwater. They were carved during the reign of Ramses II and his wife, Nefertari, in the 13th century BCE.

aswan

aswan

Our visit was memorable but short, as we had to be back to Aswan to catch our afternoon train. Four hours later we were back in Aswan, where we now sit enjoying a final view of the Upper Nile.

aswan

And now…off to Luxor!

aswan

aswan